From BSR: “Business: Blue & Green”

fishtails
>
P’fish’ers
>
A great read posted on the Business for Social Responsibility website. Very thoughtful essay by Mike Sutton, VP at Monterey Bay Aquarium, about the threats to our world’s ocean and ways to combat those threats (climate change, habitat destruction, overfishing, and pollution). Business can be (if it wants to be) a savior, as we’ve always advocated at Passionfish: Commerce and conservation working together.
>

del.icio.us Digg it Netvouz Newsvine reddit StumbleUpon Wink Yahoo MyWeb

 

Passionfish forum on ocean & seafood sustainability, summer 2010

fishtails
>
P’fishers, we recently held a fin-tastic forum on the beach on Coronado Island (San Diego, Calif) discussing ocean and seafood sustainability. Our event was co-hosted by the fabulous (and super generous) Hotel Del Coronado and the new, fun-loving nonprofit Cooks Confab that, other than being a group of cooks with a drinking problem, promotes local food and simple ways to prepare it!
>
Our panelists were: Caron Golden (freelance journalist), Tommy Gomes (fisherman, Catalina Offshore), Kristen Goodrich (board member, Slow Food Urban San Diego), Martin Alberto Hall, Ph.D. (Chief Scientist, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission), Nigella Hilgarth, Ph.D. (Executive Director, Birch Aquarium at Scripps), Don Kent (President, Hubbs Sea World Research Institute), Logan Kock (Vice President of Strategic Purchasing & Responsible Sourcing, Santa Monica Seafood, Inc.), and Andrew Spurgin (Executive Director/Chef, Waters Fine Catering, and Co-Founder, Cooks Confab and Passionfish).
>
Our forum moderators were Carl Rebstock (Executive Director, Passionfish) and Robin Seigel (National Conflict Resolution Center).
>
Our event was graphically recorded by talented cartoonist Lloyd Dangle (known for his work on the %$&!#@! Airborne packaging, among many years of political cartooning). He specializes in distilling very complex issues in a visual manner to aid problem solving. See his illustration below.
>
We got lucky with the weather given that our event was held on the beach during a California coastal summer. Yes, right on the sand just a couple of footsteps from the Pacific Ocean. I was hoping I wasn’t the only one looking at the tide charts (& freezing my butt off that week)! Rain threatened all day (and all of the previous week). But, fortunately, we only had to deal with a fine mist that barely affected anyone.
>
Optimists that we are, we had our summer clothes on beneath that marine layer and we charged ahead with our event! We’re grateful for the staff at Hotel Del Coronado who set up the stage and the awesome beach chairs for the audience, the sound/audio guys, and the audience full of culinary students and interested members of the public. Our audience participants also included representatives of several seafood companies. Thank you all.
>
Our forum was followed by a decadent reception in the grassy area at Hotel Del, then a spectacular dinner at 1500 Ocean. Check out our Facebook page for details.
>
Suffice it to say (for me, anyway), I ate about 50 oysters before the main course/s…and I think people were shocked we actually had an incredible dinner still to occur after the amazing reception. I had no qualms with it, of course.
>
A Passionfish forum is unlike other educational forums on the subjects of ocean and seafood sustainability. We offer a venue for various, valid viewpoints that examine and explore solutions to help our ocean recover –no, THRIVE– ecologically while also keeping it a viable source of protein for humankind. Yes, I know how that sounds: IMPOSSIBLE! The ocean can’t do both! Well, we think it can do both.
>
It will take sacrifice…there’s a word few seem to understand. A sacrifice in eating habits, and a sacrifice in thinking so that our ocean can continue to produce for future generations — yes, for humans. And, for the animals/wildlife within. And, it will take innovation. Big, bold innovation.
>
The panelists (listed above) for our 2010 forum represented various sectors: commercial fishing, the wholesale and retail seafood industry, science/academia, public education and outreach, fishery and aquaculture research, and the culinary/restaurant sector.
>
The common threads: Everyone believes the ocean has been damaged and needs recovery. Everyone believes commercial/wild fishing should continue (albeit greatly reduced). Everyone believes that aquaculture (the farming of finfish and shellfish) will have to meet the increasing (‘explosive’ is more like it) demand for seafood among the burgeoning world population; they also believe the U.S. has the best practices and is best prepared to innovate in this sector. Everyone believes that current fishing practices worldwide are not “sustainable.” And, everyone believes that public awareness of “ocean/seafood sustainability” is important, although no one agrees on what that looks like.
>
Our forum’s transcripts are here. We will post our audience/panelists’ Q/A soon, and we welcome your thoughtful comments and questions.
>
Patti
>

A progressive company: Arctic Storm

fishtails
>
The Arctic Storm Management Company is featured in Business Review USA. The impressive company has sustainably managed the North Pacific pollock and West Coast whiting fisheries, both certified by the Marine Stewardship Council. Excerpts below:
>
“The (company’s) vessels are members of fishery cooperatives that allocate catch shares among their members who are committed to the conservation and utilization of marine resources. A far cry from the wasteful Olympic-style fishery in which vessels race to outpace their competitors in the harvest of fish, a rational harvesting arrangement that allocates catch shares to fishing participants allows vessels to slow down production and maximize the amount of food produced per pound of fish harvested.”
>
“The rationalized fishery allows Arctic Storm and other participants an opportunity to improve the quality of the harvest and practice innovation. It allows them to increase utilization of the resources by increasing the recovery rate and producing more products for consumers. And in slowing harvest rates, participants can take the time to avoid the incidental catch of non-target species, known as bycatch.”
>
“Arctic Storm President Doug Christensen says, “There’s a strong focus on continual innovation on what we do with our fish. We’re constantly trying to figure out ways to make more products with the same amount of fish. By doing so, we’ve increased our fishmeal output, added fish oil output and added high recovery lines that increase our frozen human consumption food output.”
>
“Arctic Storm also participates in the Sea Share program, which has donated more than 100 million seafood meals to local and national food assistance programs. “This is the seafood industry’s answer to hunger in America. We participate by donating high quality frozen seafood into the Sea Share program which then is further processed and distributed through homeless shelters,” Christensen says.
>
P’fish’ers, check out the rest of the article here.

Passionfish friend and advisor Wallace J. Nichols featured in Experience Life Magazine


>
P’fish’ers, check out this great article in Experience Life Magazine featuring Wallace J. Nichols, Ph.D., a true ocean hero!

Passionfish forum on seafood and ocean sustainability: June 6, 2010. Be there, afishionados!


>
P’fisher’s! ARE YOU READY? Oh yeah, we have another fin~tastic event coming up prontisimo in San Diego. Okay, specifically, at the Hotel Del Coronado on Coronado Island, an idyllic place within the San Diego metropolis! We promise amazing discussion, some of the wisest and passionate people you’ve ever met, sharing their thoughts on seafood and ocean sustainability — and engaging with YOU on your thoughts and concerns, as well.
>
Show up a few days early, like I’m going to. Browse, surf, eat seafood…the whole week is just a blast-o-rama-o-fun. Our very own Andrew Spurgin who is in hyperdrive running his Waters Fine Catering operation, somehow found the time to create a new nonprofit called Cooks Confab. Our Passionfish executive director Carl Rebstock is flying in from Seattle where he’s based, running a 20-state emergency medical operation for the US Army. And me, well, I’ll be there to try to make sure our forum runs smoothly. We have another office in New York run by Gerard Viverito, CEC. We do keep ourselves busy on this fishy biz.
>
Following our FREE forum is an incredible seafood dinner hosted by 1500 Ocean. Reserve right now if you would like to attend! Call (619) 522-8490.